Pembridge Resources announces a new focus on the decarbonisation of renewables market. Watch the full video here

Less Ads, More Data, More Tools Register for FREE
Rolf Gerritsen, CEO at MetalNRG gives an operational update and sees an exciting year ahead
Rolf Gerritsen, CEO at MetalNRG gives an operational update and sees an exciting year aheadView Video
Pembridge Resources announces a new focus on the decarbonisation of renewables market
Pembridge Resources announces a new focus on the decarbonisation of renewables marketView Video

Latest Share Chat

Volume Buying Abrdn

Tuesday, 4th January 2022 09:51 - by Moosh

Naturally, it’s only right that I bring you examples of volume buying in action so you get an idea of my thought processes and become more familiar with the concept of volume buys.

While most examples have been in companies listed on the Alternative Investment Market (AIM), I thought it would be nice to kick off with a FTSE listed company, Abrdn (LSE:ABDN).

ABDN is a company I have never invested in before and it has never been on my radar but on 2 December 2021, I noticed that ABDN had recently announced the takeover of Interactive Investor, a popular broker for retail investors. I had a quick look at assumed cash status and was comfortable with that.

In order to calculate the volume buy, I started from the August 2021 peak price and the units to 2 December 2021 gave me a quantity of 272 shares to buy, £629.60 total spent.

I sold 272 shares on 24 December 2021 for 3.75% profit, ~£23.

Above: Three month ABDN chart

My volume buy used standard units, that is, there was no scaling up or down. The buy was 100% dictated by the market. It was the market that told me how much to buy and it was the market which turned a profit for me. All I was doing with volume buying was reacting to the market. This is what I mean by volume buys removing the emotional aspect of investing. I didn’t need to top up because any additions would’ve averaged up, and that’s against my core rule.

Catch up with Moosh's previous blog posts here

If this example has made you think, then watch out for future blog posts where I will be focusing more on AIM companies and demonstrating how the market tells me how much to buy. As volume buys are based on volume, the more volume the market puts through, the more I need to buy, and vice versa. This means that I can still have exposure to low volume companies but with a lower value to buy. This probably sounds obvious but it has positive impacts on money management and portfolio growth/stability. Using volume to dictate buy size inherently accounts for a variety of risk factors.

Reference

Pump Up the Volume – 20 December 2021 blog entry

The Writer's views are their own, not a representation of London South East's. No advice is inferred or given. If you require financial advice, please seek an Independent Financial Adviser.

Comments

You must be logged in in order to post. Click here to login.

Login to your account

Don't have an account? Click here to register.

Quickpicks are a member only feature

Login to your account

Don't have an account? Click here to register.