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Share Views Episode 4: Mid & Large Caps with Chris Bailey


Frontera Res Share Chat (FRR)



Share Price: 0.10Bid: 0.09Ask: 0.11Change: -0.005 (-4.76%)Faller - Frontera Res
Spread: 0.02Spread as %: 22.22%Open: 0.105High: 0.105Low: 0.10Yesterday’s Close: 0.105


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Puddy
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RE: Part 2
Sun 12:43
Cheers ivy I tryed to do that bring it on hear but couldn't well done
 
Ivyspivey
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Part 2
Sun 10:49
The old CanArgo, whose geologist showed me a vision of Georgia as a promised land, in effect folded in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008. Before then it was run by David Robson, who first enthused the Georgians — and his staff — with visions of just what could be achieved at Manavi but who, from 2006 onward, transferred his attention to the far side of the Caspian, notably to prospects and new discoveries in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan.
Nibladze recalls the results and consequences of the two wells drilled by the old CanArgo at Manavi. M-11 discovered oil but could not sustain the flow and the casing collapsed. M-12, over a 24-hour span produced 1,000 cubic meters of liquids of which 10% was oil and 90% was water.” But the pressure was high, better technology was required for further drilling — and that meant more cash was needed. CanArgo was engaged in trying to secure $25m in additional funding when the financial crisis struck in 2008; there was no further finance forthcoming and the company entered Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization after defaulting on a debt in 2009.
“We were able to negotiate with the creditors to successfully convert their debt into equity,” Misha recalls. In January 2010, the CanArgo Energy Corporation was formally wound up and its assets transferred to the Channel Islands-based Blake Oil & Gas. But fresh cash was needed, and that had to wait until August 2012 when Blake formed a joint venture agreement with the Czech Republic’s MND Group under which MND acquired a 50% stake in Blake’s Georgian assets in exchange for assuming exploration and production costs. Specifically, MND Group committed to spending more than $100 million in capex to fund development in the areas covered by the old CanArgo’s three production sharing contracts, the ongoing Ninotsminda field operations and two oil prospects, Manavi and Norio. But CanArgo was kept as the name for the actual operator.
With cash now in place, once again hopes are high that this time a breakthrough will be achieved, that a Georgia that seems to have such promising geological conditions can finally escape from a downward spiral that has seen oil production plummet from more than 70,000 b/d in Soviet times to barely 1,000 b/d today.
To Nibladze, the prospectivity is obvious: “In every well you drill in Georgia there are hydrocarbons,” he says. The old CanArgo, he notes spent around $200m in Georgia over 12 years of active operations. “In three years, we’re spending $100 million. It should make a difference.”

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Ivyspivey
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Puddy Old Article
Sun 10:46
Georgia’s oil prospects: déjà vu all over again
Journalists commonly find themselves writing the same piece twice, but it’s pretty rare to do so with close to a ten year interval between the stories. But what’s happening upstream in Georgia — the mountainous wine-growing Georgia of the Caucasus — really is déjà vu all over again. The same script, the same backdrop, even the same actors are all involved in the same drama: turning Georgia’s oil fortunes around, so that the country is known as a producer in its own right and not just as a transit state carrying Azerbaijani hydrocarbons to world markets.
The decade-old story runs something like this: At Manavi, east of Tbilisi and home to the vineyards that produce prize-winning white wine, a foreign company has raised a load of money and is drilling a test well expected to yield a massive flow of oil. The geologist taking this writer around this field on the southern side of the Caucasus range is explaining that the underlying geology is the same as the on the northern side, where Russia produces large quantities of oil from a host of locations, notably in Chechnya and Dagestan.
“And once we’ve mastered the geology,” I seem to remember the geologist saying, “we can produce enough oil to end all imports and , indeed, turn Georgia into a useful exporter.”
Fast forward to Tbilisi, 2013. We’re not at the field, but a company official is briefing me (over some good Mingrelian chicken washed down with red wine from Saperavi) about the $100 million program his company is embarking on in the same 1,200-square kilometer tract I visited in 2003.
“The geology — it’s the same basins as Azerbaijan and the North Caucasus,” he says. “The source rocks, the reservoirs, are the same as in the North Caucasus; cretaceous fields producing in the North Caucasus, from the Miocene. We’ve discovered the Manavi field. It’s in the Cretaceous. We had an expert from Dagestan over. He said this is the same reservoir.”
This year, perhaps five years since the last significant work was done on the field, the official’s company is due to shoot 427 km of 2D seismic, and to carry out some drilling in the Ninotsminda area, once home to much of Georgia’s gas production. Next year the work will really start to get going with a horizontal sidetrack from one of the deep wells drilled at Manavi last time around, along with a deep appraisal well at nearby Martkopi.
By 2015, the results of this drilling — Georgia’s biggest onshore oil program — should be known.
But we’ve been here before, and, at least nominally, with the same actors. The operator at Manavi is CanArgo, and the official briefing me is Mikheil – Misha – Nibladze, CanArgo’s Country Manager.
But it’s not quite the same CanArgo — then known as the CanArgo Energy Corpo
Puddy
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Sorry
Sun 10:12
Canargo
Puddy
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Have some of
Sun 10:11
You looked in to Canarsie energy
Puddy
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Have seen this
Sun 10:02
Georgia’s
JS490
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RE: Georgia Dream
Sun 02:30
We spent a lot of time and money (shareholder money) on the gas plant, and according to the May 16 RNS, we currently have the capacity to delivery 7 MMcf/d of gas from the plant, but are apparently being stymied. That's real production, and real revenue which would benefit FRR.

Gas certainly appears to be much more of a political football (pun intended) than oil, hence the renewed focus on oil operations.

On a positive note, I wouldn't underestimate the potential for the Shallow Fields area to contribute significantly to cash flow positive operations in the near-term. That alone would put FRR on a much firmer financial footing!

jmo
SurreyLad
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RE: Georgia Dream
Sat 23:45
It's all very intriguing and multi geopolitical stuff, together with our empty pockets, let's hope we can live to fight another day, month, year. If so, we may come very good. My daily fear is consolidation or bust.
Ivyspivey
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RE: Georgia Dream
Sat 23:27
JS490 As Georgian politics is such a " vipers nest" it often seems like drinking with the devil.Corruption and deceit are commonplace and this is the environment FRR have to work within however I certainly don't claim that FRR are beyond reproach and they may be constrained by what they can say/ do by Georgian politics but we don't know as FRR as as secretive and the jury is still out on whether they are to be trusted.
I judge whether a party is favourable to FRR or not depending on their pro western/ Russian stance as that as once thought to be the major issue relevant here.
I along with most have not got a clue what is going on here and certainly not sure where it is geo political concerns or more local or FRR stuff that is most relevant here.
The energy ministry is another matter altogether
Always complicated here lol
Nolosstillsell
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RE: Noloss
Sat 20:42
Ok thanks Ivy.




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