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Sareum Share Chat (SAR)



Share Price: 0.55Bid: 0.50Ask: 0.60Change: -0.05 (-8.33%)Faller - Sareum
Spread: 0.10Spread as %: 20.00%Open: 0.65High: 0.65Low: 0.55Yesterday’s Close: 0.60


Share Discussion for Sareum (SAR)


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Money_Man99
Posts: 371
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:0.45
.
20 May '14
A couple weeks old but just shows how sar-020106 has different uses that hopkirk was talking about recently
optimising measles virus-guided radiovirotherapy with external beam radiotherapy and specific checkpoint kinase 1 inhibition.

Touchefeu Y1, Khan AA, Borst G, Zaidi SH, McLaughlin M, Roulstone V, Mansfield D, Kyula J,Pencavel T, Karapanagiotou EM, Clayton J, Federspiel MJ, Russell SJ, Garrett M, Collins I,Harrington KJ.
Author information

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

We previously reported a therapeutic strategy comprising replication-defective NIS-expressing adenovirus combined with radioiodide, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and DNA repair inhibition. We have now evaluated NIS-expressing oncolytic measles virus (MV-NIS) combined with NIS-guided radioiodide, EBRT and specific checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) inhibition in head and neck and colorectal models.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Anti-proliferative/cytotoxic effects of individual agents and their combinations were measured by MTS, clonogenic and Western analysis. Viral gene expression was measured by radioisotope uptake and replication by one-step growth curves. Potential synergistic interactions were tested in vitro by Bliss independence analysis and in in vivo therapeutic studies.

RESULTS:

EBRT and MV-NIS were synergistic in vitro. Furthermore, EBRT increased NIS expression in infected cells. SAR-020106 was synergistic with EBRT, but also with MV-NIS in HN5 cells. MV-NIS mediated (131)I-induced cytotoxicity in HN5 and HCT116 cells and, in the latter, this was enhanced by SAR-020106. In vivo studies confirmed that MV-NIS, EBRT and Chk1 inhibition were effective in HCT116 xenografts. The quadruplet regimen of MV-NIS, virally-directed (131)I, EBRT and SAR-020106 had significant anti-tumour activity in HCT116 xenografts.

CONCLUSION:

This study strongly supports translational and clinical research on MV-NIS combined with radiation therapy and radiosensitising agents
 
BOOKMAN
Posts: 1,021
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Price:0.45
tim mitchell
20 May '14
has a really good track record of disappointing us here .with very vague updates and financial reports but stop don't push that sell button yet this share has taken a battering of late as is due some good news .

so tim please let us private investors know that the rumours is true that SAREUM will be taking chk1 into human trails very soon and a update on this would be great
Hopkirk
Posts: 1,145
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RE: Time scales anyone ?
18 May '14
Caesar. I think the UK timescales are similar to the EU and US. China may be a bit quicker (once aporoval to start trials is granted, which takes longer than UK / EU / US). But each trial is different. Some take 6 months for phase 1. The Mayo Myeloma trial took 7 years!

But each stage successfully started and completed will bring gains as it reduces the risk of failure. The potential is more than one programme generating multi $ Bn revenues. But that needs to be weighted up against the risk of failure and the timescales.

Its not quick

IMO, GLA
caesar
Posts: 165
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View Thread (2)
Time scales anyone ?
17 May '14
It can take up to 15 years to bring a product to market and then still require additional post-marketing Phase 4 studies:

Basic Research/Drug Development and Pre-Clinical/Translational Research (combined): 3 to 6 years
Phase 1, Phase 2, and Phase 3 Clinical Trials (combined): 6 to 7 years
FDA Review/Manufacturing: 0.5 to 2 years
Phase 4 Clinical Trial/Post-Market Surveillance/Report Adverse Events: 0.5 to 10 years (at least as long as the drug is on the market); Specific Phase 4 trials are optional and can be of variable length if assigned by the FDA as a requirement for a treatment’s approval. For example, some Phase 4 trials could last 5-10 years in order to see the effect of the treatment on populations of specific concern to the FDA.

Obviously these are for American trials, but does the UK run parallel with these time scales ?
Hopkirk
Posts: 1,145
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BiotechAndMoney
16 May '14
It looks like the "events" section on the website is out of date - just found this...

http://www.biotechandmoney.com/events

It could be something to do with Tims in-licencing comments in the last results, more financing or just football and beer.

GLA
Hopkirk
Posts: 1,145
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Price:0.45
Daily Mail
15 May '14
Here is the DM link..

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2628617/Could-measles-cure-cancer-First-trial-experimental-treatment-leaves-49-year-old-woman-complete-remission.html

And I missed the bit right at the end on the possibility of a further study.

More of the MV-NIS therapy is being manufactured for a larger, phase 2 clinical trial.

The researchers also want to test the effectiveness of the virotherapy in combination with radioactive therapy (iodine-131) in a future study.
Hopkirk
Posts: 1,145
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View Thread (2)
RE: RE: Mayo Clinic
15 May '14
Kazimira. It does look promising. But it is more a proof of concept for Oncolytic Viruses. It's the first time they have used a virus to get complete remission in people (although the other patient didnt have complete remission even that one showed good results). But I'm not sure that this particular treatment will necessarily make it to a standard treatment.

A quick google search shows that Unicef is the largest buyer of the measles vaccine but even with their economies of scale, they still pay $0.10 per dose. The Mayo treatment uses enough vaccine to immunise 10 million people. MV-NIS is a slightly altered version of this (which may cost more) but even if it can be manufactured for the same price, each individual treatment would cost $1m, or over 10 times other treatments for cancer.

This might result in more work being needed ( in the lab or more trials) before a fully effective and cost effective treatment is made available. What they might need is something which you can add to the measles virus, along with Radio and Chemo therapy. Maybe something which inhibits CHK1 (for example). Now if only we knew a company who has such a drug? :)

It might not work out, but then again you never know.

What will the Mayo news do to SAR? I dont think CHK1 has been tested on Myeloma, but Tim did say it is broadly applicable and Myeloma is one of the P53 type cancers that it seems to work on. So its still a theoretical link at present. But a promising one.

The Mayo study is starting to get media attention (mainly in the US, but the Daily Mail have it, albeit they added an extra 0 on the amount of virus needed in their typical sensationalist way). But all of this is focused on these 2 patients. If someone connects these results in people to the ICR research article on the 4 way treatment study, we may well see some of the benefits and get a much needed lift.

All IMO. GLA
caesar
Posts: 165
Question
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Price:0.45
call the bottom ?
15 May '14
At a loss: after just trawling through excoriating diatribes on iii (now discussing shorting) and pondering the polemic, Sharecrazy, chartist's sell recommendation from 1.09p to 0.5p, due to perennial cash calls, can anyone decide if we can now bottom fish or do, you sell, in May (like the proverb) and return another day - its just that such evisceration saps the confidence from even the most loyal shareholder
lego
Posts: 10,327
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Price:0.45
SAR
14 May '14
Always exiting but SP is dross.

Been here since 2011 bought 5 times.
kazimira
Posts: 80
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Price:0.45
View Thread (2)
RE: Mayo Clinic
14 May '14
Tks Hopkirk. I note what Prof Stephen Russell says in the accompanying video: "What we're really excited about with this particular approach is that we believe it can become a single-shot cure. This is very unusual. Here we've got a therapy that you give once, you give a single dose, and the outcome can be long-term remission of the cancer."
My consultant's reaction? "Looks promising!"



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