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Lloyds Banking Group Share Chat (LLOY)



Share Price: 73.33Bid: 73.32Ask: 73.34Change: 0.00 (0.00%)No Movement on Lloyds Grp.
Spread: 0.02Spread as %: 0.03%Open: 74.15High: 74.37Low: 72.90Yesterday’s Close: 73.33



Share Discussion for Lloyds Grp. (LLOY)


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boldboy
Posts: 55
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.07
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RE: Boldboy
11 Jul '14
Purple 1983
We'll beg to differ on this one, It is not as straight forward as you depict.
 
Purple1983
Posts: 59
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Price:73.13
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Boldboy
11 Jul '14
The people that are on fixed rate mortgages have already borrowed the money from Lloyd's, which in turn have already borrowed the money at a fixed rate themselves surely as they have given them the money? And on an interest rate rise they would imeadiately increase their fixed rate mortgages on offer accordingly..!
Wids
Posts: 1,320
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.56
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RE: Re: Espirito Santo
11 Jul '14
The usual statement meaning the complete opposite.

Some strange goings on over at that bank.
DD42
Posts: 420
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.55
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Re: Espirito Santo
11 Jul '14
The only thing I've heard is this:

Advisory Desk ‏@advdesk 14m
#BREAKING *BANK OF PORTUGAL SAYS BANCO ESPIRITO SANTO HAS ENOUGH CAPITAL

But they're still suspended though …
meerkat.com
Posts: 3,060
Off Topic
Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.34
Espirito Santo
11 Jul '14
Anyone know what is happening

Are they still suspended

Makes Lloyds look like a thorobred

2014 TYOTH
STC
boldboy
Posts: 55
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.28
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RE: Interest rate
11 Jul '14
I appreciate what you are saying but the interest rate also affects the cost at which lloyds borrows at and as it is the biggest morgate lender in the country it will have a short term negative impact if there is a rise as the increase cannot be passed on immediatly to the fixed rate morgates it as.
Purple1983
Posts: 59
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.25
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Interest rate
11 Jul '14
I would imagine it wouldn't of helped that much as it was anticipated that it's going to stay the same for a short while yet, maybe 6 months... But I don't really get how it should affect Lloyd's anyhow, it will only be small rises and gradual so shouldn't impact people's ability to repay and Lloyd's will adjust theirs rates accordingly to still get the same ratio of money in. I remember when Australia raised theirs rates a year or so ago... The stock market went up 2% that day, the reason Bloomberg said, was because it showed the economy was performing a lot better!
boldboy
Posts: 55
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.33
interest rate
11 Jul '14
Possible the unchanged interest rate helped the SP yesterday?
MY21
Posts: 1,830
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Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.11
Implications of fines on Banks-Cont
11 Jul '14
Bailey warned that unless the Financial Stability Board (FSB), chaired by BoE Governor Mark Carney, clinches a global deal forcing the world's biggest banks to hold "bail-inable" debt - bonds that can be tapped to cover losses if they go bust - those banks would have to hold more core capital.

Carney wants a deal for the Group of 20 economies (G20) to endorse in November to end banks being "too big to fail".

"I am optimistic. I think we are making good progress on that front," Bailey said.

He rejected criticism that stricter capital demands are making banks unable to lend or make money.

"There are many ways of making money banking. The core of it is lending and deposit taking," Bailey said.

(Reporting by Huw Jones; editing by Sophie Walker)
MY21
Posts: 1,830
Off Topic
Opinion:No Opinion
Price:73.11
Implications of fines on Banks Cap.
11 Jul '14
Potential fines now a key input into capital levels

* No global deal on bail-in debt mean higher capital levels (Adds more detail, background)
By Huw Jones

LONDON, July 10 (Reuters) - A mountain of accumulating fines for banks that have broken the rules is making it harder for regulators to work out how much capital lenders need to hold to be safe, Bank of England Deputy Governor Andrew Bailey said on Thursday.

Banks like Barclays and RBS have been fined in total $6 billion for rigging the Libor interest rate benchmark, and allegations are now emerging that the foreign exchange market has been manipulated as well.

"This is a considerable dent to rebuilding bank capital," Bailey told a Bloomberg event.

Now, when stress-testing banks to ensure they can survive any future shocks, regulators must consider any potential fines alongside other potential costs, Britain's top banking supervisor said.

The Bank is working closely with Britain's Financial Conduct Authority, which is probing the foreign currency allegations, to see what fines generally could be in the pipeline, he said, and added it was also keeping an eye on developments abroad.

"We have to read the direction of travel of other law enforcement authorities, particularly in the U.S.," said Bailey, who heads the BoE's Prudential Regulation Authority that supervises British banks.

U.S. authorities have just fined French bank BNP Paribas nearly $9 billion for violating that government's sanctions against Sudan, Cuba and Iran, sparking sharp criticism in France and concern in Europe that watchdogs in the United States are going too far.

Bailey said he was not criticising law enforcement agencies for doing their job as no bank should be "too big to jail".

"But," he added, "We have to be very clear that actions are taken which do not undermine the stability of the financial system. There is very substantial contingency planning done around these things. We have to deal with the potential consequences of this."

NO "ONE SHOT" GAME

Bailey added it would not be enough for banks simply to comply with new minimum capital requirements, but rather that the "optimal" level of capital for each would depend on several factors - including how much liquidity a bank has, and what stress tests being carried out in the European Union, uncover.

"We are not in a one shot game," he said.

Furthermore, he said, asset quality reviews - a type of balance sheet check the BoE has undertaken at British banks and now underway at top euro zone lenders in a bid to draw a line under the currency area's debt crisis - were not foolproof.

"In the best of all worlds, supervisory initiated AQRs should not reveal anything that isn't already known. I will just say that experience shows that we are not there yet," he said.

Core capital levels will also hinge on banks having a cushion of debt tha



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